Vaccination?

Count me in.

About us

“Choose life over lockdown” is a joint campaign organised by the commercial property sector and supports the Federal Government’s “Together against Coronavirus” initiative. The aim is to increase people’s willingness to get vaccinated against COVID-19 in Germany. We want to inform people in Germany about the vaccines and motivate them to get vaccinated.

 

In addition, we want to provide space for vaccination services at selected locations. Because the more people who get vaccinated, the faster we can return to normality.

About us

“Choose life over lockdown” is a joint campaign organised by the commercial property sector and supports the Federal Government’s “Together against Coronavirus” initiative. The aim is to increase people’s willingness to get vaccinated against COVID-19 in Germany. We want to inform people in Germany about the vaccines and motivate them to get vaccinated.

 

In addition, we want to provide space for vaccination services at selected locations. Because the more people who get vaccinated, the faster we can return to normality.

A campaign by

With support from

Why are vaccines so important?

The novel coronavirus is highly contagious and can result in serious illnesses known as COVID-19. Because the virus is new, many infected people do not have any defences against it yet and will therefore fall ill.

Coronavirus vaccines can prevent many such infections and subsequent periods of illness. For example, in the case of the vaccine developed by BioNTech/Pfizer, it has been calculated that out of 100 vaccinated individuals, only about 5 will fall ill with COVID-19. This means that vaccinated individuals are very unlikely to get sick if they are exposed to the coronavirus – a fact that has already been confirmed by research findings. However, we don’t yet know how long the vaccines’ protective effects will last. Therefore, you must continue to observe all social-distancing and hygiene rules even after vaccination!

 

However, vaccination not only protects the vaccinated people themselves, but also other people in their vicinity. This is because fully vaccinated people only transmit the coronavirus in very rare cases.

Which vaccines are available?

In Germany, the available vaccines are those from BioNTech/Pfizer, Moderna, Johnson & Johnson and AstraZeneca. All have been extensively tested and are highly effective against the coronavirus.

All of these vaccines are based on antigens. These are small molecular structures that are also found on the surface of the coronavirus itself. When we are vaccinated, the antigens trigger a protective response from our immune system. This protective reaction is “memorised” by our bodies and triggered once again upon contact with the coronavirus.

 

Did you experience any discomfort or adverse symptoms after being vaccinated? Or have you heard other people saying that they felt poorly afterwards? This is not a side effect, it’s actually a good sign! It shows that the immune system has started working to build up a protective reaction to a coronavirus infection.

GET VACCINATED!

You can get your vaccine directly from a doctor or at a vaccination centre. Mobile vaccination stations are also being set up in an increasing number of towns and cities.

Fact check: Fake news about vaccines

We answer questions about vaccination myths and conspiracy theories

There is no discernible risk of mRNA being integrated into the human genome. In humans, the genome is located in the form of DNA in the cell nucleus.. An integration of RNA into DNA DNA is not possible at all, largely due to differences in their chemical structure. There is also no evidence that the mRNA incorporated into the body’s cells after vaccination is transcribed into DNA.

(Source: RKI, date: 21/07/2021)

The vaccines were rigorously tested before being approved. There is no evidence that women could become infertile after vaccination.

A rumour was spread via social media that coronavirus vaccines can make people infertile because the spike proteins on the surface of the coronavirus are similar to the protein Syncytin-1, which is responsible for the formation of the placenta.

 

Based on this fact, some people leapt to the following conclusion: if a vaccinated woman’s immune system develops antibodies against the spike protein on the coronavirus, they will also attack the syncytin-1 protein and thus impair the formation of a placenta. However, as the similarity between the two proteins is in reality minimal, a cross-reaction to the COVID-19 vaccine can be ruled out.

 

(Source: RKI, date: 19/07/2021)

Despite the fact that the quantity of useful antibodies decreases after a few months following vaccination, the body of a vaccinated person can still generate a protective immune response after this time. This is because vaccines not only stimulate the production of antibodies, but also train the immune cells to recognise and destroy cells infected with coronavirus.

 

Even though these vaccines have been approved, their manufacturers are still conducting ongoing research to establish the degree of long-term protection they provide.

 

(Source: RKI, date: 02/06/2021)